Macros


Syntax
Macro <name> [(Parameter [, ...])]
  ...
EndMacro 
Description
Macros are a very powerful feature, mainly useful for advanced programmers. A macro is a placeholder for some code (one keyword, one line or even many lines), which will be directly inserted in the source code at the place where a macro is used. In this, it differs from procedures, as the procedures doesn't duplicate the code when they are called.

The Macro : EndMacro declaration must be done before the macro will be called for the first time. Because macros will be completely replaced by their related code at compile time, they are not local to a procedure.

A macro can not have a return type nor typed parameters. When a macro has some parameters, they are replaced in the macro code by the literal expression which is passed to the called macro. No evaluation is done as this stage, which is very important to understand: the evaluation of a line is started once all the macros found on this line are expanded.

The macros are divided into two categories: simple (without parameters) and complex (with parameters, needs the parentheses when calling it). When using no parameters, it's possible to replace any word with another word (or any expression). The macros can't be called recursively.

Example: Simple macro

  Macro MyNot
    Not
  EndMacro

  a = 0
  If MyNot a   ; Here the line will be expanded to : 'If Not a'
    Debug "Ok"
  EndIf
  
When using parameters, it's possible to do very flexible macros. The special concatenation character '#' can be used to create new labels or keyword by mixing the macro code and the parameter expression (spaces are not accepted between each words by the concatenation character). It's also possible to define default values for parameters, so they can be omitted when calling the macro.

Example: Macro with parameter

  Macro UMsgBox(Title, Body)
    MessageRequester(Title, UCase(Body), 0)
  EndMacro

  Text$ = "World"
  UMsgBox("Hello", "-"+Text$+"-") ; Here the line will be expanded like that:
                                  ; 'MessageRequester("Hello", UCase("-"+Text$+"-"), 0)'

Example: Macro with default parameter

  Macro UMsgBox(Title, Body = "Ha, no body specified")
    MessageRequester(Title, UCase(Body), 0)
  EndMacro

  UMsgBox("Hello") ; Here the line will be expanded like that:
                   ; 'MessageRequester("Hello", UCase("Ha, no body specified"), 0)'

Example: Macro parameter concatenation

  Macro XCase(Type, Text)
    Type#Case(Text)
  EndMacro

  Debug XCase(U, "Hello")
  Debug XCase(L, "Hello")
  

Example: Advanced multi-line macro

  Macro DoubleQuote
    "
  EndMacro

  Macro Assert(Expression)
    CompilerIf #PB_Compiler_Debugger  ; Only enable assert in debug mode
      If Expression
        Debug "Assert (Line " + #PB_Compiler_Line + "): " + DoubleQuote#Expression#DoubleQuote
      EndIf
    CompilerEndIf
  EndMacro

  Assert(10 <> 10) ; Will display nothing
  Assert(10 <> 15) ; Should display the assert
  



Syntax
UndefineMacro <name>
Description
UndefineMacro allows to undefine a previously defined macro, and redefine it in a different manner. Once the macro has been undefined, it is no more available for use.

Example: Undefine macro

  Macro Test
    Debug "1"
  EndMacro
  
  Test ; Call the macro
  
  UndefineMacro Test ; Undefine the macro, it no more exists
  
  Macro Test ; Now we can redefine the macro
    Debug "2"
  EndMacro
  
  Test ; Call the macro
  



Syntax
MacroExpandedCount
Description
MacroExpandedCount allows to get the expanded count (number of time the macro has been expanded/called). It can be useful to generate unique identifiers in the same macro for every expansion (like label, procedure name etc.).

Example: Expanded count

  Macro Test
    Debug MacroExpandedCount
  EndMacro
  
  Test ; Call the macro
  Test ; Call the macro
  Test ; Call the macro